November 22, 2002

Political Notes:

Women and minorities remain severely under-represented, with this year’s status quo election standing in stark contrast to the 1992 surge in women and racial minorities after the last round of legislative redistricting. Compared to 1993, there are two fewer African-Americans in Congress and fewer states with women in their U.S. House delegations. Minor parties tried harder than ever, but again made no significant gains, and the major parties will control all 50 governor’s mansions for the first time in more than a decade even as a growing number of Americans, especially youth, express interest in viable alternatives outside the major parties.

* Increase of women in U.S. House in 2002 elections after the 2001-2 round of redistricting: 0

* Increase of women in U.S. House in 1992 elections after the 1991-2 round of redistricting: 19

* Increase of racial minorities in U.S. House in 2002 elections after the 2001-2 round of redistricting: 3

* Increase of racial minorities in U.S. House in 1992 elections after the 1991-2 round of redistricting: 22

* Number of African-Americans in Congress in 2003: 37

* Number of African-Americans in Congress in 1993: 39

* Number of U.S. House races won by less than 20% in the 2002 House elections, after 2001-2 redistricting: 76

* Number of U.S. House races won by less than 20% in the 1992 House elections, after 1991-2 redistricting: 169

* Number of U.S. House races won by candidates facing no major party competition in 2002: 78

* Number of U.S. House races won by candidates facing no major party competition in 1992: 8

* Percent of U.S. House incumbents who defeated non-incumbent challengers in 2002 elections: 99%

* Voter turnout among adult Americans in 2002 elections: 39%

* Voter turnout among adult Germans in 2002 elections: 75%

Information from The Center for Voting and Democracy’s Election 2002 Index. (For more such statistics, please see <http://www.fairvote.org)/>

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