December 28, 2001

Editorial

Feliz Año Nuevo 2002!

Praise the Lord (Gracias a Dios)!

We lived through another year

(Sobrevivimos Otro Año)!

 

Most of us felt troubled throughout the past year. Financially, it was not the best of times for most businesses, and we often felt the heat from the furnace of depression. It was painful to see friends, who had struggled for so many years, having to suddenly close their doors to escape their financial misery. Some survived, but many didn't, especially those who sought their fortunes in the dot.com industry. The stock market took a dive and, in the process, many workers who had placed their family's future in their company's stocks, suddenly discovered that they didn't have a penny —not one red centavo — with which to provide for their loved ones.

It wasn't only the businesses that suffered. Joe Lunch Bucket, who lived off the value of his skills, suddenly discovered that there were no employers who could use him! His weekly paychecks stopped coming, and there was no safety net to protect him or his children.

The year 2001 was a dismal time for the working American, as well as for the hundreds of thousands of people who cross the border daily in order to work. These families from the colonias de Tijuana could not survive without their husbands or wives working al otro lado de la liñea. The situation was no longer about whether or not they could afford to buy steak for their family, it was about whether or not they could provide their family with sufficient sustenance to survive.

On the American side, it was a question of whether or not families could afford to live in Bonita or East Lake, or of whether or not they could keep that expensive BMW. They could always move to South Bay and trade the BMW for a run-down Chevy.

Somehow we survived, though it was nip and tuck. If it hadn't been for President George Bush screaming, "the sky is falling... the sky is falling" over the entire communication network, we wouldn't have had any comic relief during the shock of seeing the Twin Towers hit by our own planes.

I don't know folks, but as I recall we didn't get half as panicky here in California when the Japanese bombed our oil fields right off the Pacific Coast or when they attempted to land midget subs on our coasts at a time when we were fighting a REAL WAR! We just put on our helmets, slung our rifles over our backs and took off for the coast, hoping to shoot one of those Japanese! Oh, come to think of it, we did turn off all the lights in California! Sorry to say New Yorkers, we didn't miss a day of school.

Well, it has been an interesting year, even though some things never change... The PADRES still can't win any games. Don't you miss the days when they were a farm team that played in Lane Field and no one really cared that they never won? It was just fun to go. It's too bad that the team's current owners and the City folks decided they needed to be Big-Timers. They decided this could happen if they raided the city treasury, and built a Taj-Mahal ballpark next to the Convention Center. That was a dead give away... It ain't about BASEBALL folks! It's about providing entertainment for all those conventioneers — city slickers who think San Diego is an extension of Tijuana. We'll now be able to entertain them with our cheerleaders (forgot to tell you, that's next to come in our Hollywood version of Baseball)!

Well, that's the way it was in 2001. What the heck, no sense even mentioning how our elected officials raided the city cash box of $25,000,000 (yup, 25 million dollars) to provide entertainment CHARGERS style... Think about that next time you want your streets fixed! Hang on tight because 2002 promises to be even better! You might consider moving to Montana for a change of pace from America's finest city! (What a joke).

Oh:

Feliz Año Nuevo — Happy New Year!

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