June 13, 2008

The Public Forum . . . El Foro Publico

Teacher appreciation

The final match of the CVESD spring soccer season will took place between Heritage Elementary and Discovery Elementary. The soccer program is lead by a teacher from Clear View Elementary School named Gerardo Morales. Teachers from participating schools VOLUNTEER to teach students, train with them, stay after school, and attend the games. Even when pink slips were handed out to a majority of teachers in our school district,  this program continued with optimism. 

As a parent of one of the students playing in the final game at the Olympic Training Center, I would like to express my appreciation for the dedication of Mr. Morales and all the teachers who have stepped up to connect with our children and create bridges between schools in our community. 

Kimberly Longo
Chula Vista

Senator Feinstein: You Are Right!

In response to the outcry of thousands of concerned citizens throughout San Diego county, you had the courage to stand up to the paid lobbyists and politicians whose coffers were lined with Bajagua money, and demanded that the Government Accounting Office (GAO) perform an unbiased analysis of the Bajagua Plan versus the upgrade of the International Wastewater Treatment Plant in San Ysidro. The GAO stated that the existing Plant in San Ysidro would cost up to $200 million less than building Bajagua in Mexico. More than 16 environmental and health organizations support the upgrade of the IWTP as well.

It is not surprising that Representative Bob Filner is upset over the loss of his political “cash cow.” Documents revealing the campaign contributions made by Bajagua show Representative Filner receiving more than $61,000. Who wouldn’t miss that kind of change? It’s no wonder that he is frustrated with Senator Feinstein.

The real challenge lies ahead of us. After losing more than ten years while this process has dragged on, it is time for everyone to get together and develop a comprehensive clean water plan for San Diego. The health of the ocean and all who use it demands that we do so now.

Joe and Barb Miller
via email

What a blessing that Senator Diane Feinstein finally freed our area from many more years of Bajagua controversy by asking, instead, that less US Federal taxpayer money be spent on bringing the existing US treatment plant up to proper functioning level. Bajagua lobbied officials on both sides of the US-Mexico border. Is it true Bajagua spent $20 million on lobbying? If so, where did they get the money? What has to be addressed now is the sewage that streams down from Tijuana to pollute both sides of the border from Tijuana homes and businesses that are not hooked up to proper sewage pipes.

Michel Dedina
Imperial Beach

CSU cuts will hurt the economy

The Governor’s May revision, while seeking to restore some critical funding to the California State University, still falls short of the minimum needed to stop the door from closing on qualified students’ admission to the CSU. At this crucial economic juncture, it is imperative that the CSU continues to get the resources it needs to produce a highly skilled workforce and increase college-going rates of underserved communities in California.

The CSU still faces $215 million in reduced funding and serious fiscal challenges, plus $124 million in mandatory cost increases not covered by state funds, including rising health care and energy bills. Without funding to mitigate these costs, students will be facing a closed door when trying to enter the CSU this fall and current students may see an eroding quality of education.

I believe this is the wrong direction for the state to go; cuts to the CSU will only hurt California’s economy by reducing the number of qualified and trained individuals in key job industries.

The Governor’s May revision, while seeking to restore some critical funding to the California State University, still falls short of the minimum needed to stop the door from closing on qualified students’ admission to the CSU. At this crucial economic juncture, it is imperative that the CSU continues to get the resources it needs to produce a highly skilled workforce and increase college-going rates of underserved communities in California.

The CSU still faces $215 million in reduced funding and serious fiscal challenges, plus $124 million in mandatory cost increases not covered by state funds, including rising health care and energy bills. Without funding to mitigate these costs, students will be facing a closed door when trying to enter the CSU this fall and

current students may see an eroding quality of education.

I believe this is the wrong direction for the state to go; cuts to the CSU will only hurt California’s economy by reducing the number of qualified and trained individuals in key job industries.

Christopher Moreno
via email

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