June 22, 2007

Suit filed to protect Chula Vista residents from traffic, infrastructure impacts

Citizen claims UCSP violates landmark ‘Cummings ‘ Growth Control Measure

Claiming that the city’s recently approved Urban Core Specific Plan (UCSP) violates both the spirit and letter of Chula Vista’s landmark ‘Cummings’ Growth Control Measure, Chula Vista property owner and concerned resident Earl Jentz today announced the filing of a lawsuit to require the city to put in place adequate traffic impact fees, create a park impact fee for western Chula Vista equal to one required for development in the east, and to adopt a financing plan that ensures that infrastructure improvements keep pace with future growth in the city’s urban core.

“The city’s recently approved UCSP violates both the spirit and letter of the Cum-mings Initiative,” said Earl Jentz, referring to the citizen sponsored and voter approved growth management initiative. This initiative was designed to protect the quality of life of existing Chula Vista residents by requiring that traffic and infrastructure improvements keep pace with growth.

The Urban Core Specific Plan lays the framework for development in Chula Vista’s downtown area. “Specifically, the UCSP did not include a traffic impact fee for new development, relies on a park impact fee for western Chula Vista that is half that of the fee required for new development in the eastern part of the city, and fails to include a financing plan that will ensure that traffic and infrastructure improvements are made concurrent with new development,” said Earl Jentz.

“Our suit seeks to require the city to correct these three deficiencies in the UCSP plan by setting a reasonable traffic impact fee, increasing the park impact fee to that used in eastern Chula Vista, and by adopting a real financing plan with teeth to protect residents from the impact of unmanaged growth,” Jentz continued.

“We are asking the city to adopt these common sense changes, not only to bring the UCSP into compliance with the Cummings Initiative, but because they are clearly needed to properly manage expected growth. The recently approved UCSP anticipates that there will be almost three times as many residents in northwest Chula Vista than there are now, and over 100,000 new average daily trips. The decision to file this lawsuit was made only after repeated requests from community groups and concerned citizens regarding these changes fell on deaf ears at City Hall. We simply seek the city’s compliance with the Cummings Initiative, and hope the city will agree to revise the UCSP in these ways without further delays to redevelopment or costs to city taxpayers,” Jentz said.

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